Wharves, Witches and More! Scholars discover Salem History

November 8: Boston area Fulbright Scholars and their family members discovered New England history on a tour of Salem, Massachusetts. Through visits to local museums scholars gained a deeper appreciation of New England history, maritime traditions and the colonial origins of Halloween.

The tour began with a visit to House of the Seven Gables.The house, built in 1668 by sea captain and merchant, John Turner, was made famous through American author Nathaniel Hawthorne’s 1851 novel, The House of the Seven Gables. Scholars enjoyed a guided tour of the gardens, house and many of its secret passageways.

Visiting Scholars at the House of the Seven Gables.

Visiting Scholars at the House of the Seven Gables.

Next, scholars walked to Pickering Wharf, a historic seaside area, where they shopped, ate lunch, and explored nearby attractions. Several Scholars visited the U.S.S. Friendship, a reproduction of a 1797 trading ship.

Scholars explore Pickering Wharf.

Scholars explore Pickering Wharf.

Scholars then visited the Peabody Essex Museum, one of the oldest continuously operating museums in the United States. Scholars freely explored the museum’s collections of art from around the world and even had a chance to make some jewelry.

Fulbright family members proudly display their handmade jewelry.

Fulbright family members proudly display their handmade jewelry.

The day ended with a visit to the Salem Witch Museum, which introduced Scholars to the tragic events of the 17th century Salem witch trials. The museum also included an overview of the evolving concept of witches throughout history.

Waiting outside the Salem Witch Museum.

Waiting outside the Salem Witch Museum.

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